US COVID-19 Deaths in 2021 Surpass Last Year’s: Data

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By Jack Phillips(Epoch Times) The number of reported COVID-19 deaths in the United States in 2021 surpassed the total in 2020, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and Johns Hopkins University.

As of this weekend, the number of total reported COVID-19 deaths hit 770,816 since the pandemic stated according to Johns Hopkins. In 2020, about 385,343 COVID-19 deaths were reported, CDC death-certificate data show.

When subtracted from the Johns Hopkins total, it means 385,457 COVID-19 deaths have been reported so far this year. The CDC currently shows 382,861 deaths so far this year but that count lags Johns Hopkins because it only includes the reported deaths after they’ve been received and processed by the National Center for Health Statistics.

Meanwhile, Johns Hopkins’ case-to-fatality ratio for the U.S. suggests COVID-19, the illness caused by the CCP (Chinese Communist Party) virus, has an approximately 99 percent survival rate. Meanwhile, it’s likely that the number of COVID-19 cases reported to the CDC—which now stands at 47 million in the United States—is likely undercounted as not everyone has engaged in routine COVID-19 testing.

About 69 percent of the American population, including children, are at least partially vaccinated, while some 59 percent are fully vaccinated, according to CDC figures. Adults over age 65 and older have a nearly 100 percent partial vaccination rate, while 86 percent are fully vaccinated, the data shows.

It comes days after the Biden administration unveiled a rule that would mandate vaccines or testing for workers at private businesses with 100 or more employees, starting Jan. 4. The rule, which authorizes that the federal government can hand down fines of thousands of dollars per violation, has faced an avalanche of lawsuits.

Last week, the U.S. Fifth Court of Appeals reaffirmed its order to temporarily block enforcement of the rule, issuing a scathing ruling that sharply questioned the constitutionality of the mandate. After the ruling, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, or OSHA, said it would suspend enforcement of the rule.

OSHA, in posting the announcement on its website, claimed that it “remains confident in its authority to protect workers in emergencies.”

Meanwhile, in Germany, which has a higher vaccination rate than the United States, Germany’s seven-day COVID-19 incidence rate rose to the highest level since the pandemic began for the 14th consecutive day on Sunday, reaching 372.7 nationwide.

Bavarian State Premier Markus Soeder called for a quick decision to make COVID-19 vaccinations compulsory while Schleswig-Holstein State Premier Daniel Guenther said authorities should at least discuss such a step to increase pressure on unvaccinated citizens.

Reuters contributed to this report.

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