NY Times Axed Story About Damage to Kenosha After Riots Until After Election

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The mainstream media, reported falsehoods and half truths about the Kenosha riots and the Rittenhouse shootings. Photo Credit: AP

By: Jared Evan

New York Times reporter Nellie Bowles claims the newspaper held her story about the ravaging effects of the Kenosha riots on impoverished neighborhoods and small minority owned businesses until after the 2020 elections., she wrote on the Substack account of Bari Weiss.

In general, mainstream media, reported falsehoods and half truths about the Kenosha riots and the Rittenhouse shootings. Vast swaths of misinformed Americans actually believe that Kyle Rittenhouse, was a “White Supremacist” who went to a peaceful protest to hunt down innocent black protestors, outlets such as CNN and MSNBC crafted a dangerous false narrative of disinformation and straight lies.

Bowles said she was sent to report on the “mainstream liberal argument” that vandalizing buildings for racial justice was not detrimental because businesses had insurance.

This is twisted, and deranged thinking and something you would expect from members of a communist party at a college campus or radicals gathering at a park, however this is mainstream thought, from main stream politicians, pundits and the NY Times.

“It turned out to be not true,” Bowles wrote. “The part of Kenosha that people burned in the riots was the poor, multi-racial commercial district, full of small, underinsured cell phone shops and car lots. It was very sad to see and to hear from people who had suffered.”

Bowles Wrote on Substack: “Until quite recently, the mainstream liberal argument was that burning down businesses for racial justice was both good and healthy. Burnings allowed for the expression of righteous rage, and the businesses all had insurance to rebuild. When I was at the New York Times, I went to Kenosha to see about this, and it turned out to be not true. The part of Kenosha that people burned in the riots was the poor, multi-racial commercial district, full of small, underinsured cell phone shops and car lots. It was very sad to see and to hear from people who had suffered. Beyond the financial loss, small storefronts are quite meaningful to their owners and communities, which continuously baffles the Zoom-class. Something odd happened with that story after I filed it. It didn’t run. It sat and sat. Now it could be that the piece was just bad. I’ve sent in bad ones before, and I’ll do it again. A few weeks after I filed, an editor told me: The Times wouldn’t be able to run my Kenosha insurance debacle piece until after the 2020 election, so sorry”.

The story eventually ran after the election, in other words the Times did not want to run a negative piece about the riots, because it would have proven President Trump’s thesis, that the riots were destructive and dangerous. “Whatever the reason for holding the piece, covering the suffering after the riots was not a priority,” she wrote.

“The reality that brought Kyle Rittenhouse into the streets was one we reporters were meant to ignore”< Bowles said.

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