WATCH VIDEO: Biden, Fauci, Pelosi, Harris, Psaki Opposed Vaccine Mandates Only Months Ago

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(Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

By Art Moore (WND News Center) A video supercut produced by Grabien News shows that before President Biden’s vaccine mandates, top Democratic leaders, including Biden himself, were adamant that requiring people to take a vaccine was unprecedented, unenforcable and, ultimately, not within the authority of the federal government.

WATCH VIDEO PROOF


Last month, Democratic Speaker of the House Rep. Nancy Pelosi declared the government has no power to require someone to be vaccinated.

“That’s just not what we can do,” she said.

However, the Biden administration says federal workers who refuse getting vaccinated would be fired. And the president announced last week that private employers with 100 or more workers who refuse would be fined more than $13,000 per worker.

As a candidate, Biden said he was not sure he could advocate Americans taking a vaccine developed under President Trump’s leadership. And after being elected in November, he said he didn’t “think it should be mandatory.”

Earlier this year, Biden’s top coronavirus adviser, Dr. Anthony Fauci, said a mandate was a bad idea.

“You don’t want to mandate, and try and force anyone to take a vaccine. We’ve never done that,” Fauci said.

“We don’t want to be mandating from the federal government to the general population. It would be unenforceable, and not appropriate.”

White House press secretary Jen Psaki said at a press briefing: “Our interest is very simple, from the federal government, which is Americans’ privacy and rights should be protected.”

She said at another briefing that it’s “not the role of the federal government.”

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This article was originally published by the WND News Center.