Eric Adams Discusses Crime Surge in NYC on Brian Lehrer Show

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Democratic Mayoral nominee Eric Adams appeared on NY public radio station WNYC and discussed the current crime surge in the city, in addition to other interesting topics.

By: Jared Evan

Democratic Mayoral nominee Eric Adams appeared on NY public radio station WNYC and discussed the current crime surge in the city, in addition to other interesting topics.

“It is really has become a place where lawlessness is the norm. And

that is just unacceptable,” Adams said on WNYC’s “The Brian Lehrer Show.”

“You know, we’ve lost our ability to understand what it is to be a good neighbor, and it doesn’t mean being heavy-handed. It’s just having acceptable codes of conduct of how you live in a diverse city like this.”

“We need to stop the illegal use of ATVs, dirt bikes, and all the other forms of two-wheelers that are moving around our city in a very dangerous environment, up and down the sidewalk, racing in the streets,” Adams said.

“This is just unacceptable. And I don’t believe the hands-off approach is the right way to do it,” he continued, adding that there should be units designated to taking the illegal vehicles off the streets.

Over the past week NYC has seen some incredibly violent crimes, including a point-blank shooting in broad daylight, an older woman, who was dragged down the steps of the Canal Street station during an attempted robbery, who later died of brain injuries, and a teenager shot in the head, while sitting in the back of a car service in the Bronx.

Eric Adams, who ran on public safety during the primary still wants to consider himself a “progressive” and does not like being labeled a “conservative”.

Being labeled a “progressive” actually is more of a negative stigma, than the term “conservative”, outside of major cities, universities, and Hollywood. The average American associates “progressive” with failed leadership of cities like Chicago, Portland, DC, and Seattle, cities riddled with crime, corruption, and homelessness. In almost every nationwide poll taken about personal ideology, more Americans consider themselves conservative or centrist, than far left or progressive

NY Post reported:

Asked about a Marist poll that indicated progressive candidate Maya Wiley would have won the most first-place votes with people under the age of 45, Adams blamed the media for unfairly treating him as one of the more conservative options in the race.

“No one went beyond the surface of a tweet to look into the record of the candidate, and that is why many of my young voters, unfortunately, did not know my real record to make that decision to say, ‘This is a progressive candidate,’” Adams said.

“I’m not like surrendering my progressive credentials to anyone just because we define what being a progressive candidate is.”