Lifestyle Changes Help Patient Fight Diabetes – A Testimonial

0
86
Leonid Poretsky, MD, chief of endocrinology at Lenox Hill Hospital and director of Northwell Health’s Gerald J. Friedman Diabetes Institute, said that a diabetes diagnosis can be a challenge for people. Many often develop habits around foods that can get in the way of good glucose management.

We helped Kimberleigh make positive lifestyle changes—and now her Type 2 diabetes is under control.

Edited by: TJVNews.com

When Kimberleigh Smith learned she had Type 2 diabetes at a primary care visit, she was shocked. While she had put on some weight since her last checkup, she had simply chalked it up to age. Her diagnosis was a wake-up call that it was time to make some lifestyle changes.

“I quickly realized a diabetes diagnosis was not the best trajectory for my overall health moving into my 50s,” the Brooklyn resident said. “My doctor gave me a referral to the Diabetes Institute—and it really made a huge difference for me.”

Leonid Poretsky, MD, chief of endocrinology at Lenox Hill Hospital and director of Northwell Health’s Gerald J. Friedman Diabetes Institute, said that a diabetes diagnosis can be a challenge for people. Many often develop habits around foods that can get in the way of good glucose management.

Making some key lifestyle changes is the best way to help manage glucose levels—and the Diabetes Institute employs a variety of different programs to help people develop healthier habits.

“We provide a barrier-free approach to help patients develop the skills they need,” Dr. Poretsky explained. “We have endocrinologists, a social worker, an exercise physiologist, nutritionists and diabetes educators who work with patients one-on-one.”

Besides traditional medical care, the center also boasts a kitchen featuring cooking demonstrations, and offers patients gym equipment and exercise classes.

Kimberleigh credits her work with both Dr. Poretsky and the team at the Diabetes Institute in helping her get her blood sugar back on track.

“They were really great about working with me with regards to my treatment regimen,” she said. “There was so much to take advantage of at the Institute and they made it easy to get the help I needed.”

Today, Kimberleigh pays more attention to what she’s eating—and how much she’s eating, too. Her glucose levels reflect those changes. She has lost significant weight and has even gotten back into running, an activity she had given up on years ago.

“Learning how to manage my diabetes has been a good thing for me. I just feel all-around better,” she said.