Kosher Meat Sales Up Due to International Horse Meat Scare - The Jewish Voice
85.3 F
New York
Wednesday, July 6, 2022

Kosher Meat Sales Up Due to International Horse Meat Scare

- Advertisement -

Related Articles

-Advertisement-

Must read

The discovery of processed horsemeat disguised as beef in supermarkets has sparked outrage across Europe, having many consumers turning to kosher meat.
The discovery of processed horsemeat disguised as beef in supermarkets has sparked outrage across Europe, having many consumers turning to kosher meat.
Europe’s horsemeat scandal has declared a clear winner: Kosher meat.

That’s right, European carnivores are not going vegetarian, instead they are going kosher. This means increasing international sales of kosher meat in the affected countries so far: France, UK, Poland, Romania and Sweden.

Jacky Lipowicz, chairman of the Licensed Kosher Meat Traders’ Association, told the Jewish Chronicle that the scandal could be “the best thing” to happen to the kosher meat industry for years, though it’s long been known for ensuring a high level of safety.

Jewish dietary laws prohibit horsemeat – reason being that horses are not ruminants and do not have cloven hooves – and so kosher butchers are famously meticulous about prohibiting animals illegal in Jewish halacha.

What also sets kosher meat apart is the process: how the animal is fed and killed. First and foremost, animals are checked by a vet to ensure they are healthy and disease-free. The slaughter process is said to be more humane and the meats are salted which can protect from bacteria that cause foodborne illnesses. What also makes kosher meat more desirable is cleanliness; utensils used for processing and cooking, including knives, cutting boards, pots and pans must be kept separate between meat and dairy products as well as vegetables.

“People always say kosher meat is expensive, but now you know why,” joked Elaine Mann, of Louis Mann and Son butchers in Edgware, which is located northwest of London.

After the butchering process, a shomer takes note of every animal slaughtered, and the exact number is delivered to processing plants. Every piece of meat is then sealed, and if meat is found later with a broken seal it is swiftly thrown away. Inspectors also check the exact amounts sold in order to ensure no unsupervised animals have entered the chain.

Manchester Beth Din administrator Rabbi Yehuda Brodie said: “The level of supervision which exists in all kosher establishments — either retail or otherwise — ensures that any ingredient or meat meets our requirements.”

Likewise, the kashrut authority recently issued a public announcement to consumers in the UK: “All processing of kosher meat is undertaken, exclusively and without exception, using Kedassia kosher meat of UK origin, which is under constant rabbinical supervision from the time of slaughter.”

Other contributions to the kosher meat boom could be also psychological: European consumers are probably drawn to the fact that kosher products are approved by a strict religious jurisdiction, (reference to Hebrew National’s clever slogan: We Answer to Higher Authority.”)

Meanwhile, The European Commission has just unveiled new proposals intended to step up food safety rules in the EU.

balance of natureDonate

Latest article

- Advertisement -
EnglishHebrew
Skip to content