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NYC Teachers: Schools are Like a “Blackboard Jungle” and Getting Even Worse

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Teachers used to be able to do what was necessary to enforce classroom conduct and help students succeed, within reason of course. Some parents and kids now use any reason they want to say the teachers are doing something wrong. Photo Caption: Shutterstock

When our grandparents went to school in New York, some of them would tell stories of being put in a corner with a dunce cap or beaten with a ruler by a nun. Some children never even went to school because they worked a full-time job, before the days of Upton Sinclair’s “The Jungle” and child labor laws. Now the tables have turned, according to the New York Post, which reports that teachers across the city are witnessing rude and rowdy behavior from its pupils.

“If I had a dime for every time I was told to suck something, I’d be a millionaire,” according to one female Jamaica, Queens, high school teacher who spoke to the New York Post.

“They know the system. They can say whatever they want to us and get away with it, but we can’t say a thing to them,” the woman said.

Teachers used to be able to do what was necessary to enforce classroom conduct and help students succeed, within reason of course. Some parents and kids now use any reason they want to say the teachers are doing something wrong.

“You can’t even tell a student that they aren’t going to pass a test or a class anymore because they will go to an administrator and complain that you made them feel uncomfortable and we’ll get written up,” the Jamaica school teacher said.

A situation at Urban Assembly High School got pretty intense and escalated quickly when one student told a teacher that “if you fail me, I’ll blow up the school.” The teacher did the responsible thing and reported it to the proper authority, in this case, the assistant principal.

“My AP said, ‘I can’t report that,’ ” he said to the New York Post. “One of the reasons, I’m told, is that the administration wants the numbers [of suspensions and lesser disciplines] down. There’s no discipline enforced.”

A Brooklyn high school teacher talked about how students also understand that the principal holds power over the teachers, and the students can therefore use that power to their advantage by drawing teachers into a situation in which the principal would have to get involved.

“If you are targeted by the principal, they use [students] as spies in the classroom,” the Brooklyn teacher told the New York Post. The pupils “will report the teacher, provoke them to catch them in something,” he continued. “They’ll record you and use it as evidence for themselves or for the administrators or to post to social media.”

The teacher worried about the lessons the kids are being taught. “The administrators and principals are giving these kids a false sense of power that they don’t have.”

One junior high school teacher in Manhattan said that the trends are recent. In the past, some of the behavior these teachers are witnessing would not have been tolerated.

“Before, you couldn’t get away with saying ‘F you’ to a teacher or ‘Suck my d–k,’” the Manhattan teacher began, adding that “now there is no accountability.”

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