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Jerry Seinfeld Hit with Lawsuit for Selling Bogus 1958 Porsche for $1.5M

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Comedian Jerry Seinfeld is reportedly the target of a lawsuit by a firm that insists it bought his 1958 Porsche for $1.5 million, then later found it to be a fake. Photo Credit: Shutterstock

Comedian Jerry Seinfeld is reportedly the target of a lawsuit by a firm that insists it bought his 1958 Porsche for $1.5 million, then later found it to be a fake.

According to Vos Iz Neias, Fica Frio Limited’s lawsuit was filed in Manhattan federal court against a comic known for his love of vintage cars.

“The lawsuit said Fica Frio’s representatives paid $1.54 million at a March 2016 auction in Amelia Island, Florida. The price included the 10 percent auction house commission,” said Vos Iz Neias. “The lawsuit, seeking unspecified damages including the costs associated with the purchase, said they learned the car was not authentic. Fica Frio is based in the Channel Islands.”

The Associated Press reports that “According to the lawsuit, Seinfeld left a voicemail last June apologizing and promising a full refund. But it said the refund never came. Seinfeld’s lawyer, Orin Snyder, said the comedian acted in good faith.

“He has asked Fica Frio for evidence to substantiate the allegations. Fica Frio ignored Jerry and instead filed this frivolous lawsuit,” Snyder said in a statement, according to AP. “Still, Snyder said, Seinfeld “is willing to do what’s right and fair, and we are confident the court will support the need for an outside evaluator to examine the provenance of the car.”

Seinfeld’s current television show, Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee, follows him around as he interviews other comedians while driving in fancy, vintage vehicles. Seinfeld is a collector of vintage cars, according to Newsday.

According to a report by Newsday, Seinfeld acted upon the issue upon receiving the notice. “The comedian left a voicemail in June to “offer my apology for this nuisance and assure you that you will be completely indemnified,” according to the lawsuit. He also “would love to know how your guys figured it out because I find that to be interesting cause that’s impressive my guys did not I guess see anything amiss with the car when I bought it,” noted Motor1.com.

The controversy may serve to ramp up interest in the Netflix show. Episodes feature Seinfeld introducing a vintage car selected for a guest comedian, followed by a drive to a pre-selected café or restaurant for coffee. Episodes diverge from the format spontaneously, as when Michael Richards implores Seinfeld to take a side street, when Seinfeld returns after coffee with Carl Reiner to join him for dinner with Mel Brooks—or when car trouble arises. As of May 2015, the series had been streamed nearly 100 million times, according to Wikipedia. In January 2017, it was announced that Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee would migrate from Crackle to Netflix starting with the show’s tenth season.

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