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Legendary Cartoonist Stan Lee On Comic Books & the Holocaust

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We Spoke Out: Comic Books and the Holocaust, shines light on a little-known chapter in American history by showing us that comic books were talking about the Nazi genocide during the years when not many other people were

Stan Lee attends the annual Stan Lee’s Los Angeles Comic Con 2017 Expo at the Los Angeles Convention Center on Oct. 28, 2017. Photo Credit: Carla Van Wagoner – Shutterstock

People don’t usually associate so profound and forbidding a topic as the Holocaust with the costumed superheroes and bombastic villains who inhabit the world of comic books. But the truth is that those colorful characters aren’t the only residents of the comic book universe, and comic books can serve more purposes than entertainment alone.

Amidst all the thrilling tales of superheroes foiling evil villains, my colleagues and I have more than once used the pages of comic books in an effort to educate readers about real-life topics. When I wrote the storyline about drug abuse for three issues of Amazing Spider-Man in 1971, and when Neal Adams and Denny O’Neil created stories about drugs, racism, pollution, and other hot-button subjects for Green Lantern/Green Arrow from 1970 to 1972, we were no longer just comic- book creators. We were also teachers.

As far back as 1955, Al Feldstein and Bernard Krigstein created the astounding comic story «Master Race,» about an encounter between a Holocaust survivor and a Nazi war criminal.

I’m very proud that comic creators have taught about the Holocaust, too.

Sometimes we forget that talking about the Holocaust is a relatively new thing for most Americans. Sure, thirty-five states now require teaching the Holocaust in public schools. But the first of them, Illinois, adopted that policy as recently as 1990. There were very few opportunities for young people to learn about the Nazi genocide during the years before that, although comic book creators made an effort to fill that gap.

As far back as 1955, Al Feldstein and Bernard Krigstein created the astounding comic story “Master Race,” about an encounter between a Holocaust survivor and a Nazi war criminal. To this day, that story gives me chills. As far as I know, it was the first attempt by comic creators to address the Holocaust and, appropriately, it is the first story in this volume.

Cover of a 1979 edition of Captain America featuring a storyline in a concentration camp

In the 1960s and 1970s, in the pages of comic books such as Marvel’s Captain America and Sgt. Fury, DC’s Star Spangled War Stories and Sgt. Rock, and James Warren’s Eerie magazine, writers and artists used the comics medium to teach young people about one of the darkest eras in human history. For more than a few, a story in a comic book was their first exposure to the Holocaust. I take great pride in the role comics creators played in introducing this topic. Because educating young people about the Holocaust is crucial to ensuring that such an indescribable atrocity will never be repeated. And there can be no more important mission than that.

Stan Lee is publisher emeritus of Marvel Comics and co-creator of such iconic comic book characters as Spider-Man, the X-Men, the Hulk, and the Fantastic Four.

By: Stan Lee

(Reprinted from We Spoke Out: Comic Books and the Holocaust by permission.)

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