Poland Denies that Controversial “Holocaust Law” Has Been Suspended

Auschwitz, a former Nazi death camp located in modern day Poland, with its infamous gate–'Arbeit Macht Frei'–works makes you free–above the entrance

A Polish government spokesman has categorically denied reports published in the Israeli media on Saturday which said the controversial Poland Holocaust Bill had been suspended, according to a Times of Israel report.

The Polish government announced on Saturday that it would delay implementation of the controversial “Holocaust Law,” according to an INN report.

“Due to Israeli pressure, the Polish Justice Minister announced that the law will not be implemented before the Constitutional Tribunal rules on the matter. A Polish staff is expected to arrive in Israel with the intention of reaching an Israeli-Polish agreement,” an official Israeli source said.

The Ruderman Family Foundation, which campaigned against the law, responded, “We are thankful for the Polish government’s decision to freeze the law. The pressure exerted by the dozens of thousands who signed our petition did its job. We call on the Polish government to announce a complete retraction of this law.”

Responding to these reports, Joanna Kopczynska who represents the Polish government promptly denied the veracity of these reports, saying that the law would indeed come into effect, as planned, on 1 March.

According to the Times of Israel report, Stories emanating from the Israeli press said the law would be held back, while talks with Israel were ongoing, but a spokesman for the Polish Ministry of Justice tweeted in reply: “In connection with the information provided in the media about “freezing of the Institute of National Remembrance Act,” @MS_GOV_PL informs that every act passed in Poland by the parliament and signed by the president becomes a law and goes into effect according to the date specified in it.”

The law, which was approved by the Polish Senate, allows a sentence of up to three years in prison for anyone ascribing “responsibility or co-responsibility to the Polish nation or state for crimes committed by the German Third Reich.”

Last Tuesday, Polish Deputy Foreign Minister Bartosz Cichocki said no criminal charges will be brought against offenders, but mentioned that his country will require some remedy for untrue statements.

At the end of January, Holocaust historian, researcher and published author Dr. Inna Rogatchi told Arutz Sheva, “The current move of the Polish Sejm to pass the new law banning the mentioning the word ‘Polish’ regarding complicities in Nazi crimes during the Second World War and the Holocaust is nothing short of an Inquisition. Its efforts to control life are characterized by the same zealotry and the same conscious efforts to impose the orchestrated, distorted picture of reality and history upon people, society and the world.

It is arrogant and blatantly false–and they know perfectly well that they are imposing lies. It is really too much, Poland, telling us what to call your far too many accomplices to the annihilation of Jewish people during WWII, and you’re threatening everyone, even beyond the Polish borders, with fines and up to three years’ imprisonment.

At the same time, it is also utterly pathetic to see such provincialism and short-sighted views. It is the worst of Poland, and its people will soon be made aware of what the world thinks of their ugly medieval exercises.”

Edited by: JV Staff
(INN)

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